Haptics for Human Performance Augmentation

Sensory Feedback for Smart Prosthetics

Researchers aim for 'direct brain control' of prosthetic arms

Engineers work to design prosthetic arm that allows amputees to feel what they touch

http://www.media.rice.edu/media/NewsBot.asp?MODE=VIEW&ID=15983&SnID=1928...

Engineering researchers at four U.S. universities are embarking on a four-year project to design a prosthetic arm that amputees can control directly with their brains and that will allow them to feel what they touch. While it may sound like science fiction, the researchers say much of the technology has already been proven in small-scale demonstrations.

The research at Rice University, the University of Michigan, Drexel University and the University of Maryland is made possible by a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation's Human-Centered Computing program.

Category: 

Robot Assisted Rehabilitation - Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

The objective of this research effort is to develop a rehabilitation robot and associated controllers to be used in both therapy and evaluation of subjects with incomplete spinal-cord injuries. We are working in collaboration with Dr. Gerard Francisco and Dr. Nuray Yozbatiran of TIRR-Memorial Hermann and UTHealth.

Project Status: 

Active

Category: 

Tendon Vibration for Inducing Consistent and Controllable Proprioceptive Illusions

Vibrating muscle tendons at a range of frequencies is known to produce movement illusions in human subjects. Although there are examples in the literature on the use of vibrators to transmit simple cues such as direction information, movement illusions due to vibration have not been utilized as a method of providing illusory kinesthetic feedback. One possible main application is artificial proprioception for prosthetic devices.

Project Status: 

Inactive

Category: 

Skill Transfer in Human-Robot Haptic Interactions

The primary goal of this research effort is to improve the effectiveness of skill transfer, rehabilitation, and collaboration via haptic devices. We hypothesize that mediating robotic interfaces (either serving as the expert or placed between a human expert and the novice) can facilitate and improve the effectiveness of skill transfer and collaboration in expert-novice pairs as well as in therapist-patient rehabilitation interactions. Various shared control system architectures for skill transfer are being studied in two phases.

Project Status: 

Inactive

Category: 

Subscribe to RSS - Haptics for Human Performance Augmentation