Rehabilitation Robotics

Sensory Feedback for Smart Prosthetics

Researchers aim for 'direct brain control' of prosthetic arms

Engineers work to design prosthetic arm that allows amputees to feel what they touch

http://www.media.rice.edu/media/NewsBot.asp?MODE=VIEW&ID=15983&SnID=1928...

Engineering researchers at four U.S. universities are embarking on a four-year project to design a prosthetic arm that amputees can control directly with their brains and that will allow them to feel what they touch. While it may sound like science fiction, the researchers say much of the technology has already been proven in small-scale demonstrations.

The research at Rice University, the University of Michigan, Drexel University and the University of Maryland is made possible by a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation's Human-Centered Computing program.

Category: 

Remembering Motor Skills with Reward-Based Reinforcement, Haptic Guidance, and Error Augmentation

There has been significant research aimed at leveraging programmable robotic devices to provide haptic assistance or augmentation to a human user so that new motor skills can be trained efficiently and retained long after training has concluded. The success of these approaches has been varied, and retention of skill is typically not significantly better for groups exposed to these controllers during training. These findings point to a need to incorporate a more complete understanding of human motor learning principles when designing haptic interactions with the trainee.

Project Status: 

Active

Category: 

Development and Control of a 3DOF MRI-Compatible Haptic Device

Through the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with a haptic device, it is possible to study changes in brain activity while a patient undergoes rehabilitation-like protocols. By measuring changes in brain activity of a patient undergoing neurorehabilitation during fMRI, optimal patient-specific therapy regimens might be obtained. This research aims to develop, characterize, and control a parallel three degrees of freedom magnetic resonance (MR) compatible haptic device, called the MR-SoftWrist, which can measure and support wrist movements during fMRI.

Project Status: 

Active

Category: 

Minimal Assist-as-Needed (mAAN) Controller for Robotic Rehabilitation

Providing minimal assistance to neurologically impaired individuals only becomes possible when the subject's functional capability is known.  In this research we introduce a minimal assist-as-needed (mAAN) controller which utilizes sensorless force estimation to determine subject inputs as a function of time, before providing a corresponding assistance with adjustable ultimate bounds on position error.

Project Status: 

Active

Category: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Rehabilitation Robotics