Haptics for Human Performance Augmentation

Haptic Guidance and Training Using OpenWrist and CUFF

This research project focuses on delivering haptic guidance through cutaneous (skin stretch and squeeze) methods to help train people for new tasks. Haptic devices are tremendously useful for giving customized feedback during training. These devices can simulate forces associated with real-world tasks or provide guidance forces that help users to complete the task more effectively or accurately. It has been shown, however, that providing both task forces and guidance forces simultaneously through the same haptic interface can lead to confusion and worse performance.

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Inactive

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Real-Time Performance Assessment and Feedback for Manual and Robotic Surgery Platforms

Building competency in performing minimally invasive procedures is a significant effort, as trainees must acquire both procedural knowledge and manual dexterity to perform complicated tasks. If done correctly, these procedures can lead to shorter post-operative periods and fewer complications than open surgery. This is especially true in the endovascular domain, which require surgeons to navigate flexible guidewires and catheters across blood vessels to perform a variety diagnostic and therapeutic procedures such as heart valve replacements and aneurysm repair. 
 

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Active

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Tasbi: A compact bracelet device capable of rendering complex multisensory squeeze and vibrotactile feedback

Augmented and virtual reality are poised to deliver the next generation of computing interfaces. To fully immerse users, it will become increasingly important to couple visual information with tactile feedback for interactions with

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Active

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AIMS Haptic Testbed

This project investigates human perception of haptic, or touch, cues. In the field of haptics, there is a need for a standardized method to characterize haptic cues and assess human perception of these cues. Most haptic devices are characterized using methods that are unique to the experiment, making direct comparisons across studies challenging.

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Active

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Design and Development of Exoskeletons for Hand-Wrist Rehabilitation

Robotic devices are excellent candidates for delivering repetitive and intensive practice that can restore functional use of the upper limbs, even years after a stroke. Rehabilitation of the wrist and hand in particular are critical for recovery of function, since hands are the primary interface with the world.  However, robotic devices that focus on hand rehabilitation are limited due to excessive cost, complexity, or limited functionality. A design and control strategy for such devices that bridges this gap is critical.

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Inactive

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Robot Assisted Rehabilitation - Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

The objective of this research effort is to develop a rehabilitation robot and associated controllers to be used in both therapy and evaluation of subjects with incomplete spinal-cord injuries. We are working in collaboration with Dr. Gerard Francisco and Dr. Nuray Yozbatiran of TIRR-Memorial Hermann and UTHealth.

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Inactive

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Tendon Vibration for Inducing Consistent and Controllable Proprioceptive Illusions

Vibrating muscle tendons at a range of frequencies is known to produce movement illusions in human subjects. Although there are examples in the literature on the use of vibrators to transmit simple cues such as direction information, movement illusions due to vibration have not been utilized as a method of providing illusory kinesthetic feedback. One possible main application is artificial proprioception for prosthetic devices.

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Inactive

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Skill Transfer in Human-Robot Haptic Interactions

The primary goal of this research effort is to improve the effectiveness of skill transfer, rehabilitation, and collaboration via haptic devices. We hypothesize that mediating robotic interfaces (either serving as the expert or placed between a human expert and the novice) can facilitate and improve the effectiveness of skill transfer and collaboration in expert-novice pairs as well as in therapist-patient rehabilitation interactions. Various shared control system architectures for skill transfer are being studied in two phases.

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Inactive

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